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| Compilations :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore

This section also includes Compilations offering collections of all the Old Skool DJ's playing at all the old UK Festivals, Raves, and Clubs during the 1980's - 1990's

The Rave & Hardcore Section offers DJ Sets Compilations from the following areas

Rave & Hardcore Artists
Rave & Hardcore Events
Rave & Hardcore Yearly Package

| Compilations :: Shopping Carts

This site now only uses PayPal Checkout so you can pay for any of the DJ Sets listed on this site straight away using any major Credit/Debit Card listed below. You can also pay straight from your Bank Account.

To use PayPal Checkout please use the Orange Buttons provided on any of the pages.

| Compilations :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Artists

Select a DJ, Club, Event or Year from list to view the appropriate available Compilations:


ARTISTS & GROUPS

B
C

CARL COX

London, UK
Rave & Hardcore
Classic Techno
Techno Tech House

   
D
E
F
G
H
J

JUMPIN JACK FROST

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

M

MASTERVIBE

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

P

PILGRIM

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

PRODUCER

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

R

RANDALL

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

RATPACK

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

RATTY

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

S

SCORPIO

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

SEDUCTION

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

T

TOP BUZZ

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

TREVOR ROCKCLIFFE

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

V

VIBES

London, UK

Rave & Hardcore

VINYLGROOVER

Dublin, Ireland

Rave & Hardcore

 

| Compilations :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Events

These DVD Compilations offer a great collection of rare Old Skool Rave & Hardcore DJ Sets from all the biggest DJ's from a particular UK Rave & Hardcore Event from the 1990's.

| Compilations :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Events

[9]
Current available Compilations:

Amnesia House
(1990 - 1994)

Sets: 61 Hours: 58

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

Dance Paradise
(1993 - 1994)

Sets: 65 Hours: 55

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

Dance Trance
(1992 - 1994)

Sets: 36 Hours: 34

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

Dreamscape
(1991 - 1998)

Sets: 367 Hours: 30

 DVD:

(6)

 Our Price: £34.99
   
 

View Compilation

Fantazia
(1991 - 1994)

Sets: 60 Hours: 57

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

Hardcore Heaven
(1994 - 1999)

Sets: 94 Hours: 57

 DVD:

(2)

 Our Price: £19.99
   
 

View Compilation

Helter Skelter
(1993 - 1999)

Sets: 486 Hours: 400

 DVD:

(8)

 Our Price: £39.99
   
 

View Compilation

Pandemonium
(1993 - 1996)

Sets: 60 Hours: 50

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

The Hacienda
(1982 - 2012)

Sets: 27 Hours: 36

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

Universe
(1992 - 1994)

Sets: 30 Hours: 25

 DVD:

(1)

 Our Price: £9.99
   
 

View Compilation

 

| Compilations :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Year Packs: 1988 - 1999

These yearly DVD Compilations offer a great collection of rare Old Skool Rave & Hardcore DJ Sets from all the biggest Clubs and Events from a particular year during 1988 - 1999.

| Compilations :: Rave & Hardcore Year Packs: 1988 - 1999

[8]
Current available Compilations:

1988 - 91 Compilation

Sets: 107 Hours: 85

 DVD:

(2)

 Our Price: £19.99
   
 

View Compilation

1992 Compilation

Sets: 206 Hours: 160

 DVD:

(4)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1993 Compilation

Sets: 296 Hours: 275

 DVD:

(5)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1994 Compilation

Sets: 327 Hours: 290

 DVD:

(5)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1995 Compilation

Sets: 228 Hours: 201

 DVD:

(4)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1996 Compilation

Sets: 281 Hours: 269

 DVD:

(4)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1997 Compilation

Sets: 242 Hours: 200

 DVD:

(4)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation

1998 - 99 Compilation

Sets: 234 Hours: 215

 DVD:

(4)

 Our Price: £29.99
   
 

View Compilation


| Special Offers :: Old Skool Rave & Hardcore

You can also check out the Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Special Offers to see what Old Skool Rave & Hardcore Special Offers are available from each of the DJ's & Group's listed in the table above.

We have 2 different types of Old Skool Classics, Rave & Hardcore Special Offers that we offer, these come in the form of either MP3 DVD's, MP3 Blu-Ray's or Hard Drive Offers.

The Old Skool Classics, Rave & Hardcore DVD's/Blu-Rays' offer bulk lots of Old Skool Classics, Rave & Hardcore DJ Sets from a particular DJ on MP3 DVD's or MP3 Blu-Ray's

Whereas the Old Skool Classics, Rave & Hardcore Hard Drive offers huge amounts of Old Skool Classics, Rave & Hardcore DJ Sets on an External USB Hard Drive.

 

| Web Links :: DJ's Web Pages & Social Networking Pages

You can click on the icons below the Artist's/Artist's Web Links section on their main page to be taken to the different Web Pages or Social Networking Pages for that DJ.

You can choose from the following 9 options, Website, MySpace Page, Twitter Page, Facebook Page/Group, Last FM Page, Discogs Page, Resident Advisor Page, iLike Page, and YouTube Channel, though not all options will be available for all DJ's.




| YouTube Videos :: DJ's Playing Live

You can now view Live YouTube Videos of the various DJ's playing so you can hear and listen to what the look and sound like before you purchase.

The videos are available from the DJ's Home Page and also where available there are also video clips from the actual festivals and events within the DJ Set Compilations Pages themselves.

 

| Our eBay DJ Sets Store :: Find Us on eBay

If you prefer to buy DJ Sets from us using eBay, so you can leave eBay Feedback you can access our eBay Store

We are an established and respected eBay Power Seller so you can guarantee that you will get top rated service. Our current eBay Store is located at DJSetsStore.co.uk

| Rave & Hardcore :: The History of Rave Music

In the late 1950s in London the term "Rave" was used to describe the "wild bohemian parties" of the Soho beatnik set. In 1958 Buddy Holly recorded the hit "Rave On," citing the madness and frenzy of a feeling and the desire for it to never end.[2] The word "rave" was later used in the burgeoning mod youth culture of the early 1960s as the way to describe any wild party in general. People who were gregarious party animals were described as "ravers". Pop musicians such as Steve Marriott of The Small Faces and Keith Moon of The Who were self-described "ravers".

Presaging the word's subsequent 1980s association with electronic music, the word "rave" was a common term used regarding the music of mid-1960s garage rock and psychedelia bands (most notably The Yardbirds, who released an album in the US called Having a Rave Up). Along with being an alternative term for partying at such garage events in general, the "rave-up" referred to a specific crescendo moment near the end of a song where the music was played faster, heavier and with intense soloing or elements of controlled feedback. It was later part of the title of anelectronic music performance event held on 28 January 1967 at London's Roundhouse titled the "Million Volt Light and Sound Rave". The event featured the only known public airing of an experimental sound collage created for the occasion by Paul McCartney of The Beatles – the legendaryCarnival of Light recording.

With the rapid change of British pop culture from the mod era of 1963–1966 to the hippie era of 1967 and beyond, the term fell out of popular usage. During the 1970s and early 1980s until its resurrection, the term was not in vogue, one notable exception being in the lyrics of the song "Drive-In Saturday" by David Bowie (from his 1973 album Aladdin Sane) which includes the line "It's a crash course for the ravers." Its use during that era would have been perceived as a quaint or ironic use of bygone slang: part of the dated 1960s lexicon along with words such as "groovy". The perception of the word changed again in the late 1980s when the term was revived and adopted by a new youth culture, possibly inspired by the use of the term in Jamaica.

In the mid to late 1980s a wave of psychedelic and other electronic dance music, most notably acid house and Techno, emerged and caught on in the clubs, warehouses, and free-parties first in Manchester in the mid 80's and then later London . In many ways what would become known as the Rave scene, was influenced by the Northern Soul scene which throughout the late 1960s and through the 1970s and 80's had involved large groups of mainly working class kids dancing all night to rare US soul records while popping amphetamines. When Margaret Thatcher's policies in the late 70's lead to the closure of the UK's textile industry in the northwest, suddenly large mills and warehouses became empty and illegal parties were held in them. The first warehouse parties in Manchester were organised by the group The Stone Roses back in 1985, when to get around the licensing laws they would play a gigg and book a line up of DJs under the dusused arches of Piccadilly train station. These parties were then advertised as an all night video shoot, and the kids who bought tickets for £5 would have an ip piece sellotaped to the back as their fee for being extras in a video shoot, thus for several months the forces of law and order were kept at bay.

Dance music was always prominent with big electro, Jazz Funk and early house tunes being played in a somewhat balearic mix alongside New Order, The Clash and The Smiths.House music caught on very quickly in the north and midlands from 1986 onwards, even being played in mainstream night clubs. In 1988 London sudden;y adopted this scene, and rebranded it, so records which a week earlier had been House Records, were suddenly Acid House and smiley badges and other marketing paraphernalia became involved.These early raves were called Acid House Parties. They were mainstream events that attracted thousands of people (up to 25,000[citation needed] instead of the 4,000 that came to earlier warehouse parties). Acid House parties were first re-branded "rave parties" in the media, during the summer of 1989 by Neil Andrew Megson during a television interview, however, the ambience of the rave was not fully formed until 28 May 1991. In the UK, in 1988–89, raves were similar to football matches in that they provided a setting for working-class unification, in a time with a union movement in decline and few jobs, and many of the attendees of raves were die-hard football fans.

In the late 1980s, the word "rave" was adopted to describe the subculture that grew out of the acid house movement. Activities were related to the party atmosphere of Ibiza, a Mediterranean island in Spain, frequented by British, Italians, and German youth on vacation. The fear that a certain number of rave party attendees used "club drugs" such as MDMA, cocaine, amphetamines and, more recently, ketamine, was taken by authorities as a pretext to ban those parties altogether.

British politicians responded with hostility to the emerging rave party trend. Politicians spoke out against raves and began to fine anyone who held illegal parties. Police crackdowns on these often-illegal parties drove the scene into the countryside. The word "rave" somehow caught on in the UK to describe common semi-spontaneous weekend parties occurring at various locations linked by the brand new M25 London Orbital motorway that ringed London and the Home Counties. (It was this that gave the band Orbital their name.) These ranged from former warehouses and industrial sites, in London, to fields and country clubs in the countryside.

| Rave & Hardcore :: The History of Hardcore Music

Early hardcore producers such as SL2, Prodigy, Hyper-On Experience, DJ Jonny L and Sonz of a Loop da Loop Era, along with record labels such as Moving Shadow, Reinforced, XL and Formation evolved in a period where Techno was developing a harder edge, exploring the complex breakbeats that would later manifest themselves as jungle and the subsequent development of drum and bass. The stylistic influence of techno including the movie, cartoon and media samples, and powerful synthesizer-based breakdowns characterised this earlier form of UK hardcore, which some believed to have hit its first peak in 1992. For example, some fan websites go so far as to hyperbolically proclaim "1992 was the best year for music, EVER!"

With the diversity in sound available to producers rising with the onset of progressively more advanced computer and music production systems, electronic music was evolving at a rapid pace during this period. Hardcore, techno, and drum and bass began to split during this intense period of creativity, spinning off the genres ragga and darkside.
The United Kingdom-based rave hardcore scene of the 1990s encompassed several native styles through the years, techno and hardcore being the respective dominant genres in the North and South of the country for much of this period.

Happy hardcore evolved from hardcore music in the early 1990s. Its characteristic 4/4 beat "happy" sound distinguishes it from most other forms of hardcore. The term 'UK hardcore' refers to the evolution of the happy hardcore sound and is not a general term for hardcore (gabber or techno) that comes from the UK.

Through a combination of factors, hardcore had taken a new musical direction towards the latter half of the 1990s. It now had little musical resemblance to its origins, generally becoming more vocal-based and at times producing cover versions of popular songs. This sound attracted a younger audience in the UK. Elsewhere at this time, this particular sound had found a new worldwide audience in places such as Australia, Canada, Japan and the United States.

Producers looked to regenerate the United Kingdom rave hardcore music scene towards the end of the 20th century, taking influence from many different styles whilst trying to leave the late 1990s happy hardcore image behind. Their sound was called UK hardcore; it has seen new producers enter the scene. This current sound similarly has also found followers from all corners of the globe.

Hardcore also received its own special in 2004 on BBC Radio 1 entitled John Peel Is Not Enough named after a CLSM track of the same name.

Nowadays (post-2000), the UK hardcore rave scene is a thriving scene with many producers, DJs, MCs and labels. UK hardcore is seen as an underground genre, but recent albums such as the Clubland X-treme Hardcore series have exposed the music to a more commercial audience. It is known that the younger generation of ravers are enjoying the hardcore music scene and will continue to progress and become much more mainstream than when it originally came from clubs.

2009 saw DJ Kutski land his own show on Radio 1. Along with various other harder styles, UK hardcore receives much air time and the show continues to grow from strength to strength. The show has had the likes of CLSM as live guests, and a range of guest mixes. While the genre remains very much an underground style of music, its receiving crucial mainstream air time. 2011, however, has seen the closure of a number of labels, such as the veteran Freeform label; Nu Energy Collective, coupled with the end of the infamous Freeformation events. Kevin Energy and DJ Sharkey also announced their retirements, which stirred some worry amongst the community about the decline in popularity for hardcore. Nevertheless, other hardcore labels such as Evolution and Quosh have celebrated their milestone 100th releases.

Recently, hardcore has seen a growing abundance of digital labels, and amongst them, upcoming artists such as the highly acclaimed Fracus and Darwin. UK hardcore has also started to take many different directions with influences from dubstep, electro, techno and oldskool rave once again becoming popular in many modern productions.


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